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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2018, Article ID 5340717, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/5340717
Research Article

Mindfulness Meditation Is Related to Long-Lasting Changes in Hippocampal Functional Topology during Resting State: A Magnetoencephalography Study

1Department of Motor Sciences and Wellness, University of Naples “Parthenope”, Naples, Italy
2Department of Engineering, University of Naples “Parthenope”, Naples, Italy
3Institute of Applied Sciences and Intelligent Systems, CNR, Pozzuoli, Italy
4Department of Science and Technology, University of Naples “Parthenope”, Naples, Italy
5Institute for Diagnosis and Cure Hermitage Capodimonte, Naples, Italy
6IRCCS Santa Lucia Foundation, Rome, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Giuseppe Sorrentino; ti.eponehtrapinu@onitnerros.eppesuig

Received 30 July 2018; Revised 10 October 2018; Accepted 23 October 2018; Published 18 December 2018

Academic Editor: Guy Cheron

Copyright © 2018 Anna Lardone et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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