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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2018, Article ID 6574178, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/6574178
Research Article

Effects of Time-Compressed Speech Training on Multiple Functional and Structural Neural Mechanisms Involving the Left Superior Temporal Gyrus

1Faculty of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
2Division of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
3Division of Medical Neuroimaging Analysis, Department of Community Medical Supports, Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
4Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
5Department of Functional Brain Imaging, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
6Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo, Japan
7Division of Clinical Research, Medical-Industry Translational Research Center, Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, Fukushima, Japan
8Human and Social Response Research Division, International Research Institute of Disaster Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
9Smart Ageing International Research Center, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
10Department of Psychiatry, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan
11School of Medicine, Kobe University, Kobe, Japan

Correspondence should be addressed to Hikaru Takeuchi; pj.ca.ukohot.cadi@ihekat

Received 7 March 2017; Accepted 1 November 2017; Published 20 February 2018

Academic Editor: J. Michael Wyss

Copyright © 2018 Tsukasa Maruyama et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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