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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2018, Article ID 9803764, 17 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/9803764
Review Article

The Role of Cell Adhesion Molecule Genes Regulating Neuroplasticity in Addiction

1Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, University of Toledo College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, USA
2Molecular Neurobiology Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Intramural Research Program, Baltimore, MD, USA
3New Mexico VA Healthcare System, Albuquerque, NM, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to F. Scott Hall; ude.odelotu@llah.knarf

Received 14 August 2017; Accepted 10 December 2017; Published 20 February 2018

Academic Editor: Michele Fornaro

Copyright © 2018 Dawn E. Muskiewicz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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