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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2019, Article ID 1678984, 17 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/1678984
Research Article

Early Brain Damage Affects Body Schema and Person Perception Abilities in Children and Adolescents with Spastic Diplegia

1Scientific Institute, IRCCS E. Medea, Neuropsychiatry and Neurorehabilitation Unit, Bosisio Parini, Lecco, Italy
2Scientific Institute, IRCCS E. Medea, 0-3 Centre for the At-Risk Infant, Bosisio Parini, Lecco, Italy
3Scientific Institute, IRCCS E. Medea, Specialist Functional Rehabilitation Unit, Bosisio Parini, Lecco, Italy
4Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience, Department of Languages and Literatures, Communication, Education and Society, University of Udine, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Niccolò Butti; ti.ailgimafartsonal@ittub.oloccin

Received 29 March 2019; Accepted 24 July 2019; Published 18 August 2019

Academic Editor: Alfredo Berardelli

Copyright © 2019 Niccolò Butti et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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