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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2019, Article ID 6724903, 21 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/6724903
Review Article

M2 Macrophages as a Potential Target for Antiatherosclerosis Treatment

1Department of Neurology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, China
2Department of Dermatology, Wuhan No.1 Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, China
3Department of Neurology, Puai Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430033, China
4Department of Infectious Diseases, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Man Li; moc.621@ysllmm and Lei Zhao; nc.ude.tsuh@oahziel

Received 13 August 2018; Revised 6 November 2018; Accepted 28 November 2018; Published 21 February 2019

Academic Editor: Tara Walker

Copyright © 2019 Ying Bi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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