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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2019, Article ID 7946987, 20 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/7946987
Research Article

Compensatory Plasticity in the Lateral Extrastriate Visual Cortex Preserves Audiovisual Temporal Processing following Adult-Onset Hearing Loss

Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada

Correspondence should be addressed to Brian L. Allman; ac.owu.hciluhcs@namlla.nairb

Received 18 December 2018; Accepted 19 March 2019; Published 15 May 2019

Academic Editor: Josef Syka

Copyright © 2019 Ashley L. Schormans and Brian L. Allman. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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