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Neurology Research International
Volume 2011, Article ID 124256, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/124256
Review Article

Transforming Growth Factor-Beta Signaling in the Neural Stem Cell Niche: A Therapeutic Target for Huntington's Disease

1Institute of Molecular Regenerative Medicine, Paracelsus Medical University, Strubergasse 21, 5020 Salzburg, Austria
2Department of Neurology, University of Münster Medical School, 48129 Münster, Germany
3Division of Molecular Neurology, University Hospital Erlangen, 91054 Erlangen, Germany
4Department of Neurology, University of Regensburg, D-93053 Regensburg, Germany

Received 15 November 2010; Accepted 19 February 2011

Academic Editor: T. Ben-Hur

Copyright © 2011 Mahesh Kandasamy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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