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Neurology Research International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 295389, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/295389
Review Article

Modeling the Encephalopathy of Prematurity in Animals: The Important Role of Translational Research

1Department of Pathology, Children’s Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
2Department of Neurology, Children’s Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA

Received 29 November 2011; Accepted 18 January 2012

Academic Editor: Tara DeSilva

Copyright © 2012 Hannah C. Kinney and Joseph J. Volpe. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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