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Neurology Research International
Volume 2012, Article ID 847634, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/847634
Research Article

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation with the Maximum Voluntary Muscle Contraction Facilitates Motor Neuron Excitability and Muscle Force

1Health Sciences, School of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa 761-0793, Japan
2Department of Neurology, Tokyo Metropolitan neurological Hospital, Tokyo, Japan
3Gastroenterology and Neurology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa, Japan

Received 25 November 2011; Accepted 12 January 2012

Academic Editor: Yusaku Nakamura

Copyright © 2012 Tetsuo Touge et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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