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References

  1. Y. Rehman, N. Rehman, and R. Rehman, “Peripheral cytokines as a chemical mediator for postconcussion like sickness behaviour in trauma and perioperative patients: literature Review,” Neurology Research International, vol. 2014, Article ID 671781, 12 pages, 2014.
Neurology Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 671781, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/671781
Review Article

Peripheral Cytokines as a Chemical Mediator for Postconcussion Like Sickness Behaviour in Trauma and Perioperative Patients: Literature Review

1Neuro Science, Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, Mc Master University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
2CCRA, Mc Master University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
3Gomal University, D I Khan, Pakistan
4Windsor University, St Kits, Anguilla

Received 6 November 2013; Revised 26 March 2014; Accepted 27 March 2014; Published 28 April 2014

Academic Editor: Changiz Geula

Copyright © 2014 Yasir Rehman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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