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Neurology Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 627642, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/627642
Research Article

Deletion of Ovarian Hormones Induces a Sickness Behavior in Rats Comparable to the Effect of Lipopolysaccharide

1Department of Biology, Faculty of Basic Sciences, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan (Khorasgan) Branch, Isfahan, Iran
2Neurocognitive Research Center and Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Azadi Square, Mashhad 9177947564, Iran
3Neurogenic Inflammation Research Center and Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
4Pharmacological Research Center of Medicinal Plants, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
5Mashhad Technical Faculty, Technical and Vocational University, Mashhad, Iran

Received 24 September 2014; Revised 26 December 2014; Accepted 5 January 2015

Academic Editor: Changiz Geula

Copyright © 2015 Hamid Azizi-Malekabadi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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