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Neurology Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 9060751, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9060751
Research Article

Increased Serum Levels of Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha, Resistin, and Visfatin in the Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Case-Control Study

1Biochemistry Department, Medical School, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran
2Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran
3Department of Psychiatry, Medical School, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran
4Centre for Stem Cell Biology (CSCB), Department of Biomedical Science, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK
5Hyperlipidemia Research Center, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran

Received 6 August 2016; Revised 27 October 2016; Accepted 3 November 2016

Academic Editor: Changiz Geula

Copyright © 2016 Mohammad Ali Ghaffari et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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