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Nursing Research and Practice
Volume 2011, Article ID 293837, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/293837
Review Article

Understanding the Person through Narrative

1College of Nursing, University of Tennessee, 1200 Volunteer Boulevard, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA
2BeardenPsych, 5401 Kingston Pike, Knoxville, TN 37919, USA

Received 27 December 2010; Revised 17 February 2011; Accepted 28 February 2011

Academic Editor: Sheila Payne

Copyright © 2011 Joanne M. Hall and Jill Powell. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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