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Nursing Research and Practice
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 397258, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/397258
Research Article

Key Working for Families with Young Disabled Children

1School of Health, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE, UK
2Children's Nursing Research Unit, Alder Hey Children's NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, L12 2AP, UK
3Blenheim House Child Development and Family Support Centre, Blackpool Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Blackpool FY3 8LZ, UK

Received 31 December 2010; Revised 29 April 2011; Accepted 20 May 2011

Academic Editor: Ellen F. Olshansky

Copyright © 2011 Bernie Carter and Megan Thomas. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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