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Nursing Research and Practice
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 705892, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/705892
Research Article

Health Resources and Strategies among Employed Women in Norway during Pregnancy and Early Motherhood

1Department of Health Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stavanger, 4036 Stavanger, Norway
2Centre for Women’s, Family and Child Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Buskerud & Vestfold University College, P.O. Box 235, 3603 Kongsberg, Norway

Received 26 November 2014; Accepted 26 March 2015

Academic Editor: Linda Moneyham

Copyright © 2015 Marit Alstveit et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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