Obstetrics and Gynecology International
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Acceptance rate8%
Submission to final decision102 days
Acceptance to publication25 days
CiteScore2.100
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Determinants of Postpartum Intrauterine Contraceptive Device Uptake among Women Delivering in Public Hospitals of South Gondar Zone, Northwest Ethiopia, 2019: An Unmatched Case-Control Study

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Obstetrics and Gynecology International publishes articles related to obstetrics, maternal-fetal medicine, gynecologic oncology, uro-gynecology, reproductive medicine, infertility, reproductive endocrinology, and sexual medicine.

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Research Article

Evaluation of Peripartum Hysterectomy in a Tertiary Care Unit and Its Effect on Patients’ Long-Term Physical and Mental Wellbeing: Quest Is Not Over When You Save the Life

Objectives. Peripartum hysterectomy can be performed as an elective procedure or as a life-saving emergency procedure in obstetrics. It is associated with significant maternal morbidity and mortality. We report peripartum hysterectomies done during the study period in a tertiary referral centre, Colombo, Sri Lanka. Methodology. We collected data on all severe acute maternal morbidity and mortality events (SAMM) from June 01, 2014, to June 01, 2015, at De Soysa Hospital for Women (DSHW). We invited all women who underwent PPH to complete the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey questionnaire (SF-36) before hospital discharge and at six months after the hysterectomy date to assess their general and mental health before and after surgery. Focus group discussions (FGD) were used to further evaluate the patient experience and to identify service delivery improvements. Results. There were eleven peripartum hysterectomies done during the study period for 7160 deliveries. None were primigravida. Median age and gestation were 36 years and 37 weeks, respectively. The commonest indication for peripartum hysterectomy was a morbidly adherent placenta (seven). Nine of the deliveries were elective lower-segment caesarean section and two were vaginal deliveries. Four emergency peripartum hysterectomies were done for primary postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) and two for secondary PPH. All patients required intensive care and there were no maternal deaths. The analysis of SF-36 data revealed that all patients suffered a significant reduction in the quality of life at six months after the surgery. FGD highlighted that most patients needed further counselling and support to improve their physical, psychological, and social wellbeing. Some of the patients were willing to share their experience on voluntary basis to help those undergoing peripartum hysterectomies in the future. Conclusion. Peripartum hysterectomy is an important life-saving procedure associated with severe maternal morbidity and mortality. This study reveals that the physical, psychological, and social adverse effects would remain in the long term.

Research Article

Maternal and Perinatal Outcome of Maternal Obesity at RSCM in 2014–2019

Obesity is a pandemic found in many countries. It is estimated that, in 2025, more than 21% of women in the world will suffer from obesity and its number keeps increasing yearly. Obesity in pregnancy is one of the important challenges in obstetric services given the prevalence and potential adverse effects on the mother and fetus. Obese women have a higher risk of developing gestational diabetes, gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, venous thromboembolism, postpartum hemorrhage, cesarean delivery, and maternal death. The aim of this research is to determine the prevalence of maternal and perinatal complication in various obesity grades. This research was an observational descriptive study using the cross-sectional design. The inclusion criterion is obese pregnant women whose delivery was done in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo National General Hospital (RSCM) from 2014 to 2019. The exclusion criterion in this study is the incomplete medical record. A total of 111 subjects were included in the study. Obesity grades in this study were based on World Health Organization (WHO) obesity, divided into 3 classifications which are obese I (30–34.9 kg/m2), obese II (35–39.9 kg/m2), and obese III (≥40 kg/m2). Maternal outcomes in this study were birth method, gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, and premature rupture of membrane (PROM). Perinatal outcomes in this study were preterm birth, birth weight, APGAR score, and postdelivery neonatal care. In this study, obese patients had a mean age of 31.23 years, mean gravida 2, parity 1, and abortion 0. Most of these patients used an intrauterine device (IUD) for family planning (74.8%). There were no differences in age, parity status, and family planning methods in each group of patients with different body mass index (). Maternal characteristics are the majority of deliveries performed cesarean delivery (86.5%), cases of diabetes mellitus are more common in obese I patients (50%), preeclampsia is more prevalent in obese grade II patients (34,4%), and premature rupture of membranes (PROM) is more common in patients with obese II (52,4%). However, there was no difference in the prevalence of maternal outcomes between groups. There was a median gestational age of 37 weeks in all obesity grades, the highest percentage of preterm births owned by obese II patients (32,6%), the mean birth weight of babies tends to increase along with the weighting of the body mass index group, and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) treatment rooms were mostly occupied from mother with obese II groups (18%). There was no difference in the first-minute and fifth-minute APGAR scores between study groups (). There were no differences in perinatal outcomes between groups. There were no significant differences in maternal and perinatal outcomes prevalence between different obesity grades. However, the rate of maternal and perinatal complications in obese women is higher than the normal population, thus requiring sophisticated prevention and approach toward handling the pregnancy.

Research Article

Performance of Integrated Emergency Surgical Officers at Mizan-Tepi University Teaching Hospital, Mizan-Aman, Ethiopia: A Retrospective Cohort Study

Introduction. Surgical physician extenders are used in Ethiopia and sub-Saharan Africa where there is a lack of surgical providers. Methods. We tested characteristics associated with and outcomes of births attended by an integrated emergency surgical officers (IESOs) as compared to midwives and physician providers. Results. Of 1,000 women in our convenience sample, data on birth attendant was missing on 5 women (0.5%). Of the remaining women, almost three-fourths (73.6%, n = 732) of women were attended by a midwife, almost a quarter were attended by an IESO (24.4%, n = 243), 10 women were attended by a physician with a General Practitioner level of training (1.0%), 5 women were delivered by an Ob/Gyn resident (0.5%), and 5 women were attended by an Ob/Gyn (0.5%). Women had a higher likelihood of being attended by an IESO than a midwife if they underwent forceps-assisted (RR 88.4, ), vacuum-assisted (RR 45.2, ), or cesarean birth (RR 161.8, ) as compared to an unassisted vaginal birth. IESOs are performing more operative vaginal and cesarean births than other delivery providers. Outcomes of their deliveries are worse than those of midwives, but this is likely due to the acuity level of the patients and not the provider type.

Research Article

Risk of Selected Fetal Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes at Advanced Maternal Age: A Retrospective Cohort Study in Debre Markos Referral Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

Introduction. Pregnancy at an advanced maternal age is defined as pregnancy at 35 years or older. Today, women postpone pregnancy due to different socioeconomic and personal reasons. However, there was limited evidence on fetal adverse outcomes’ association with pregnancy at an advanced maternal age in Ethiopia and particularly in the study area. This study was aimed at assessing the effect of pregnancy at an advanced age on selected neonatal adverse pregnancy outcomes in Debre Markos Referral Hospital, Ethiopia, 2019. Methods. Institution-based retrospective cohort study was conducted on 303 exposed (35 years and older) and 604 nonexposed (20–34 years old) immediate postpartum women who delivered at Debre Markos Referral Hospital after 28 weeks of gestation. All exposed women who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were sampled, and systematic random sampling was employed for those in the nonexposed group. The data were collected from 1st of July to 30th of December, 2019, by face-to-face interview and extraction from maternal chart using a structured questionnaire and data extraction checklist, respectively. Binary logistic regression (bivariate and multivariable) model was fitted, and wealth index was analyzed by principal component analysis. Adjusted relative risk with respect to 95% confidence interval was employed for the strength and directions of association between advanced maternal age and selected adverse pregnancy outcomes, respectively. -value of <0.05 was used to declare statistical significance. Results. The incidence of adverse neonatal outcomes including stillbirth, preterm birth, and low birth weight in the advanced maternal age group was 13.2%, 19.8%, and 16.5%, respectively. The incidence of stillbirth, preterm birth, and low birth weight in the nonexposed group was 3.1%, 8.4%, and 12.4%, respectively. The advanced maternal age group had three times the risk of stillbirth compared with the nonexposed group (ARR = 3.14 95% CI (1.30–7.00)). The advanced maternal age group had 2.66 times the risk of delivering preterm fetus (ARR = 2.66 95% CI (1.81–3.77)) compared with the younger counterparts. Low birth weight was not significantly associated with pregnancy at an advanced maternal age. Conclusion. Fetal adverse outcomes including stillbirth and preterm birth were significantly associated with pregnancy at an advanced maternal age.

Research Article

Placenta Creta: A Spectrum of Lesions Associated with Shallow Placental Implantation

Background. On placental histology, placenta creta (PC) ranges from clinical placenta percreta through placenta increta and accreta (clinical and occult) to myometrial fibers with intervening decidua. This retrospective study aimed to investigate the clinicopathologic correlations of these lesions. Methods. A total of 169 recent consecutive cases with PC (group 1) were compared with 1661 cases without PC examined during the same period (group 2). The frequencies of 25 independent clinical and 40 placental phenotypes were statistically compared between the groups using chi-square test or analysis of variance where appropriate. Results. Group 1 placentas, as compared with group 2 placentas, were statistically significantly () associated with caesarean sections (11.2% vs. 7.5%), antepartum hemorrhage (17.7% vs 11.6.%), gestational hypertension (11.2% vs 4.3%), preeclampsia (11.8% vs 2.6%), complicated third stage of labor (18.9% vs 6.4%), villous infarction (14.2% vs 8.9%), chronic hypoxic patterns of placental injury, particularly the uterine pattern (14.8%, vs 9.6%), massive perivillous fibrin deposition (9.5% vs 5.3%), chorionic disc chorionic microcysts (21.9% vs 15.9%), clusters of maternal floor multinucleate trophoblasts (27.8% vs 21.2%), excessive trophoblasts of chorionic disc (24.3% vs 17.3%), segmental fetal vascular malperfusion (27.8% vs 19.9%), and fetal vascular ectasia (26.2% vs 15.2%). Conclusion. Because of the association of PC with gestational hypertensive diseases, acute and chronic placental hypoxic lesions, increased extravillous trophoblasts in the chorionic disc, chorionic microcysts, and maternal floor trophoblastic giant cells, PC should be regarded as a lesion of abnormal placental implantation and abnormal trophoblast invasion rather than decidual deficiency only.

Research Article

Lived Experiences of Adolescent Mothers Attending Mbale Regional Referral Hospital: A Phenomenological Study

Background. Adolescence is a period of transition from childhood to adulthood, and is a critical stage in ones’ development. It is characterized by immense opportunities and risks. By 2016, 16% of the world’s population was of adolescents, with 82% residing in developing countries. About 12 million births were in 15–19 year olds. Sub-Saharan Africa, particularly East Africa, has high adolescent pregnancy rates, as high as 35.8% in eastern Uganda. Maternal mortality ratio (MMR) attributable to 15–19 years olds is significant with 17.1% of Uganda’s MMR 336/100.000 live births being in this age group. Whereas research is awash with contributing factors to such pregnancies, little is known about lived experiences during early motherhood. This study reports the lived experiences of adolescent mothers attending Mbale Hospital. Materials and Methods. A phenomenological study design was used in which adolescent mothers that were attending Young Child Clinic were identified from the register and simple random sampling was used to select participants. We called these mothers by way of phone numbers and asked them to come for focus group discussions that were limited to 9 mothers per group and lasting about 45 minutes–1 hour. Ethical approval was sought and informed written consent obtained from participants. At every focus group discussion, the data which had largely been taken in local languages was transcribed and translated verbatim into English. Results. The research revealed that adolescent mothers go through hard times especially with the changes of pregnancy and fear of unknown during intrapartum and immediate postpartum period and are largely treated negatively by family and other community members in addition to experiencing extreme hardships during parenting. However, these early mothers’ stress is alleviated by the joy of seeing their own babies. Conclusion. Adolescent motherhood presents a high risk group and efforts to support them during antenatal care with special adolescent ANC clinics and continuous counseling together with their household should be emphasized to optimize outcome not only during pregnancy but also thereafter. Involving these mothers in technical courses to equip them with skills that can foster self-employment and providing support to enable them pursue further education should be explored.

Obstetrics and Gynecology International
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate8%
Submission to final decision102 days
Acceptance to publication25 days
CiteScore2.100
Impact Factor-
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