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Obstetrics and Gynecology International
Volume 2010, Article ID 198709, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/198709
Review Article

Epigenetic Regulatory Mechanisms Associated with Infertility

1Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Wilhelm Johannsen Centre for Functional Genome Research, Faculty of Health Sciences, Blegdamsvej 3B, University of Copenhagen, 2200 N, Copenhagen, Denmark
2Department of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics, Jaslok Hospital and Research Centre 15, Dr. G Deshmukh Marg, Mumbai 400 026, India

Received 29 September 2009; Accepted 29 June 2010

Academic Editor: Shi-Wen Jiang

Copyright © 2010 Sheroy Minocherhomji et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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