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Obstetrics and Gynecology International
Volume 2012, Article ID 612946, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/612946
Research Article

Pelvic Organ Distribution of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Injected Intravenously after Simulated Childbirth Injury in Female Rats

1Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Cleveland Clinic, Euclid Avenu ND20, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA
2Department of Urology, The Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue Q100, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA
3Department of Neuroscience, The Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue NC30, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA
4Department of Stem Cell Biology & Regenerative Medicine, The Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue NE30, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA
5Departments of Cardiovascular Medicine and Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, The Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue NE30, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA
6Departments of Biomedical Engineering, Urology, and Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, The Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue ND20, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA
7Advanced Platform Technology Center, Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA

Received 8 April 2011; Accepted 26 June 2011

Academic Editor: Johannes Bitzer

Copyright © 2012 Michelle Cruz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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