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Obstetrics and Gynecology International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 985606, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/985606
Review Article

Contemporary Clinical Management of the Cerebral Complications of Preeclampsia

1Department of Perinatal Medicine, The Royal Women’s Hospital, Cnr Grattan Street and Flemington Road, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia
2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
3Department of Anaesthetics, The Royal Women’s Hospital, Cnr Grattan Street and Flemington Road, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia
4Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology and Department of Pharmacology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
5Monash Ultrasound for Women, 15 Murray Street, Clayton, VIC 3170, Australia
6Ultrasound Department, The Royal Women’s Hospital, Cnr Grattan Street and Flemington Road, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia

Received 8 November 2013; Accepted 7 December 2013

Academic Editor: João Bernardes

Copyright © 2013 Stefan C. Kane et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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