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Obstetrics and Gynecology International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 9069054, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9069054
Research Article

Pregnancy in Sickle Cell Disease Is a Very High-Risk Situation: An Observational Study

1Pediatric Unit, Centre Hospitalier de Cayenne “Andrée Rosemon”, rue des Flamboyants, BP 6006, 97306 Cayenne Cedex, French Guiana
2Integrated Center of Sickle Cell Disease (ICS), Centre Hospitalier de Cayenne “Andrée Rosemon”, rue des Flamboyants, BP 6006, 97306 Cayenne Cedex, French Guiana
3Department of Medical Information, Centre Hospitalier de Cayenne “Andrée Rosemon”, rue des Flamboyants, BP 6006, 97306 Cayenne Cedex, French Guiana
4Obstetrics and Gynecology Unit, Centre Hospitalier de Cayenne “Andrée Rosemon”, rue des Flamboyants, BP 6006, 97306 Cayenne Cedex, French Guiana
5Obstetrics and Gynecology Unit, Centre Hospitalier de l’Ouest Guyanais Franck Joly, 16 boulevard du Général de Gaulle, BP 245, 97393 Saint-Laurent-du-Maroni, French Guiana

Received 15 February 2016; Revised 6 May 2016; Accepted 24 May 2016

Academic Editor: W. T. Creasman

Copyright © 2016 Narcisse Elenga et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Sickle cell disease is a serious genetic disorder affecting 1/235 births in French Guiana. This study aimed to describe the follow-up of pregnancies among sickle cell disease patients in Cayenne Hospital, in order to highlight the most reported complications. 62 records of pregnancies were analyzed among 44 females with sickle cell disease, between 2007 and 2013. Our results were compared to those of studies conducted in Brazil and Guadeloupe. There were 61 monofetal pregnancies and 2 twin pregnancies, 27 pregnancies among women with SS phenotype, 30 SC pregnancies, and five S-beta pregnancies. The study showed that the follow-up of patients was variable, but no maternal death was found. We also noted that the main maternofetal complications of pregnancies were anemia (36.5%), infection (31.7%), vasoocclusive crisis (20.6%), preeclampsia (17.5%), premature birth (11.1%), intrauterine growth retardation (15.9%), abnormal fetal heart rate (14.3%), and intrauterine fetal death (4.8%). Pregnancies were more at risk among women with SS phenotype. Pregnancy in sickle cell disease patients requires a supported multidisciplinary team including the primary care physician, the obstetrician, and the Integrated Center for Sickle Cell Disease.