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Obstetrics and Gynecology International
Volume 2018, Article ID 5250843, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/5250843
Research Article

The Experience of Women with Obstetric Fistula following Corrective Surgery: A Qualitative Study in Benadir and Mudug Regions, Somalia

1Pan African University Life and Earth Sciences Institute (PAULESI), University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
2Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Global Science University, Galkayo, Somalia
3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University College Hospital, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
4Department of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria

Correspondence should be addressed to Adam A. Mohamed; moc.liamg@nacirfamada and M. David Dairo; moc.oohay@oriadrd

Received 14 March 2018; Accepted 9 July 2018; Published 27 September 2018

Academic Editor: Peter E. Schwartz

Copyright © 2018 Adam A. Mohamed et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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