Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity

Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity / 2009 / Article

Open Access

Volume 2 |Article ID 765396 | 7 pages | https://doi.org/10.4161/oxim.2.1.7860

Systemic Oxidative Stress Is Increased to a Greater Degree in Young, Obese Women Following Consumption of a High Fat Meal

Received19 Dec 2008
Revised06 Jan 2009
Accepted15 Jan 2009

Abstract

High fat meals induce oxidative stress, which is associated with the pathogenesis of disease. Obese individuals have elevated resting biomarkers of oxidative stress compared to non-obese. We compared blood oxidative stress biomarkers in obese (n = 14; 30 ± 2 years; BMI 35 ± 1 kg•m−2) and non-obese (n = 16; 24 ± 2 years; BMI 23 ± 1 kg•m−2) women, in response to a high fat meal. Blood samples were collected pre-meal (fasted), and at 1, 2, 4 and 6 hours post meal, and assayed for trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), xanthine oxidase activity (XO), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), malondialdehyde (MDA), triglycerides (TAG), and glucose. An obesity status effect was noted for all variables (p < 0.001; MDA p = 0.05), with obese women having higher values than non-obese, except for TEAC, for which values were lower. Time main effects were noted for all variables (p ≤ 0.01) except for TEAC and glucose, with XO, H2O2, MDA and TAG increasing following feeding with a peak response at the four or six hour post feeding time point. While values tended to decline by six hours post feeding in the non-obese women (agreeing with previous studies), they were maintained (MDA) or continued to increase (XO, H2O2 and TAG) in the obese women. While no interaction effects were noted (p > 0.05), contrasts revealed greater values in obese compared to non-obese women for XO, H2O2, MDA, TAG and glucose, and lower values for TEAC at times from 1–6 hours post feeding (p ≤ 0.03). We conclude that young, obese women experience a similar pattern of increase in blood oxidative stress biomarkers in response to a high fat meal, as compared to non-obese women. However, the overall oxidative stress is greater in obese women, and values appear to remain elevated for longer periods of time post feeding. These data provide insight into another potential mechanism related to obesity-mediated morbidity.

Copyright © 2009 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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