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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 194586, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/194586
Review Article

Strategies for Reducing or Preventing the Generation of Oxidative Stress

Laboratory for Oxidative Stress Research, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ljubljana, Zdravstvena Pot 5, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia

Received 20 August 2011; Revised 20 October 2011; Accepted 21 October 2011

Academic Editor: Antonio Ayala

Copyright © 2011 B. Poljsak. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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