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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2011, Article ID 293769, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/293769
Review Article

ROS and RNS Signaling in Heart Disorders: Could Antioxidant Treatment Be Successful?

Vitamin Research Institute, Moscow, Russia

Received 27 April 2011; Revised 30 May 2011; Accepted 2 June 2011

Academic Editor: Daniela Giustarini

Copyright © 2011 Igor Afanas'ev. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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