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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 841749, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/841749
Review Article

The Importance of Antioxidant Micronutrients in Pregnancy

1Division of Women's Health, Maternal and Fetal Research Unit, King's College London, St. Thomas' Hospital, London SE1 7EH, UK
2Human Genetics, School of Molecular and Medical Sciences, University of Nottingham, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK

Received 30 March 2011; Accepted 6 June 2011

Academic Editor: Cinzia Signorini

Copyright © 2011 Hiten D. Mistry and Paula J. Williams. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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