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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2011, Article ID 935160, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/935160
Research Article

Role of Oxidative Stress in Transformation Induced by Metal Mixture

Departamento de Medicina Genómica y Toxicología Ambiental, Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria 04510, DF, Mexico

Received 8 August 2011; Accepted 7 September 2011

Academic Editor: Guillermo Zalba

Copyright © 2011 Silva-Aguilar Martín et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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