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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2012, Article ID 681367, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/681367
Research Article

The Redox Imbalance and the Reduction of Contractile Protein Content in Rat Hearts Administered with L-Thyroxine and Doxorubicin

1Medical Biology Unit, Medical University of Lublin, 20-950 Lublin, Poland
2Human Anatomy Department, Medical University of Lublin, 20-950 Lublin, Poland
3Clinical Pathomorphology Department, Medical University of Lublin, 20-950 Lublin, Poland
4Oncological Pneumology and Alergology Department, Medical University of Lublin, 20-950 Lublin, Poland
5Lloyds Pharmacy, 333 Meadowhead, Sheffield S8 9TU, UK

Received 7 August 2011; Revised 15 October 2011; Accepted 15 November 2011

Academic Editor: Neelam Khaper

Copyright © 2012 Agnieszka Korga et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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