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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2013, Article ID 104024, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/104024
Review Article

Quinolinic Acid: An Endogenous Neurotoxin with Multiple Targets

1Departamento de Neuroquímica, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía Manuel Velasco Suárez, Insurgentes Sur 3877, S.S.A., 14269 México, DF, Mexico
2Laboratorio de Neuroinmunología, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía Manuel Velasco Suárez, Insurgentes Sur 3877, S.S.A., 14269 México, DF, Mexico
3Departamento de Biología, Facultad de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 04510 México, DF, Mexico

Received 14 May 2013; Revised 23 July 2013; Accepted 1 August 2013

Academic Editor: Renata Santos

Copyright © 2013 Rafael Lugo-Huitrón et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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