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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2013, Article ID 408681, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/408681
Review Article

Redox Regulation in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

1Department of Biochemistry, La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Vic 3086, Australia
2School of Psychological Science, La Trobe University, Vic 3086, Australia
3Florey Department of Neuroscience, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic 3010, Australia

Received 17 October 2012; Revised 7 January 2013; Accepted 10 January 2013

Academic Editor: Jeannette Vasquez-Vivar

Copyright © 2013 Sonam Parakh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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