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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2013, Article ID 523652, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/523652
Review Article

The Haptoglobin-CD163-Heme Oxygenase-1 Pathway for Hemoglobin Scavenging

Department of Biomedicine, University of Aarhus, Ole Worms Alle 3, Building 1170, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark

Received 20 March 2013; Revised 9 May 2013; Accepted 13 May 2013

Academic Editor: Mohammad Abdollahi

Copyright © 2013 Jens Haugbølle Thomsen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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