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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2013, Article ID 589606, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/589606
Research Article

Hypothermia Improves Oral and Gastric Mucosal Microvascular Oxygenation during Hemorrhagic Shock in Dogs

Department of Anesthesiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf, Moorenstrasse 5, 40225 Duesseldorf, Germany

Received 26 March 2013; Revised 3 September 2013; Accepted 1 October 2013

Academic Editor: Lance B. Becker

Copyright © 2013 Christian Vollmer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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