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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2013, Article ID 703571, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/703571
Review Article

Natural History of the Bruise: Formation, Elimination, and Biological Effects of Oxidized Hemoglobin

1Department of Medicine, University of Debrecen, Debrecen 4012, Hungary
2MTA-DE Vascular Biology, Thrombosis and Hemostasis Research Group, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen 4012, Hungary
3Department of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40059, USA
4Department of Pediatrics, University of Debrecen, Debrecen 4012, Hungary

Received 28 February 2013; Accepted 12 April 2013

Academic Editor: Emanuela Tolosano

Copyright © 2013 Viktória Jeney et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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