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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2013, Article ID 972913, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/972913
Review Article

Role of Glutathione in Cancer Progression and Chemoresistance

Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of General Pathology, Via LB Alberti 2, 16132 Genoa, Italy

Received 22 January 2013; Revised 26 April 2013; Accepted 29 April 2013

Academic Editor: Donald A. Vessey

Copyright © 2013 Nicola Traverso et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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