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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2014, Article ID 215858, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/215858
Research Article

Ghrelin Therapy Improves Survival after Whole-Body Ionizing Irradiation or Combined with Burn or Wound: Amelioration of Leukocytopenia, Thrombocytopenia, Splenomegaly, and Bone Marrow Injury

1Radiation Combined Injury Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, MD 20889, USA
2Department of Radiation Biology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA
3Department of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA

Received 20 May 2014; Accepted 19 September 2014; Published 13 October 2014

Academic Editor: Jeannette Vasquez-Vivar

Copyright © 2014 Juliann G. Kiang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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