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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 290381, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/290381
Research Article

Enhancement of Cellular Antioxidant-Defence Preserves Diastolic Dysfunction via Regulation of Both Diastolic Zn2+ and Ca2+ and Prevention of RyR2-Leak in Hyperglycemic Cardiomyocytes

Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara University, Ankara 06100, Turkey

Received 24 September 2013; Accepted 17 December 2013; Published 13 February 2014

Academic Editor: Susana Llesuy

Copyright © 2014 Erkan Tuncay et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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