Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2014, Article ID 345105, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/345105
Research Article

Antiaging Properties of a Grape-Derived Antioxidant Are Regulated by Mitochondrial Balance of Fusion and Fission Leading to Mitophagy Triggered by a Signaling Network of Sirt1-Sirt3-Foxo3-PINK1-PARKIN

1Cardiovascular Research Center, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, CT, USA
2Laboratory of Physiologic Studies, Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Debrecen University, Debrecen, Hungary
3Department of Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Pondicherry University, Pondicherry, India
4Center for Medicinal Food and Applied Nutrition, Jadavpur University, Jadavpur, Kolkata, India

Received 14 August 2013; Revised 17 October 2013; Accepted 18 October 2013; Published 12 January 2014

Academic Editor: Yanfang Chen

Copyright © 2014 Somak Das et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. R. Scherz-Shouval and Z. Elazar, “ROS, mitochondria and the regulation of autophagy,” Trends in Cell Biology, vol. 17, no. 9, pp. 422–427, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. D. C. Chan, “Mitochondrial fusion and fission in mammals,” Annual Review of Cell and Developmental Biology, vol. 22, pp. 79–99, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. H. Chen and D. C. Chan, “Mitochondrial dynamics—fusion, fission, movement, and mitophagy—in neurodegenerative diseases,” Human molecular genetics, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. R169–176, 2009. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. W. Liu, R. Acín-Peréz, K. D. Geghman, G. Manfredi, B. Lu, and C. Li, “Pink1 regulates the oxidative phosphorylation machinery via mitochondrial fission,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 108, no. 31, pp. 12920–12924, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. F. Billia, L. Hauck, F. Konecny, V. Rao, J. Shen, and T. W. Mak, “PTEN-inducible kinase 1 (PINK1)/Park6 is indispensable for normal heart function,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 108, no. 23, pp. 9572–9577, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. C. A. Gautier, T. Kitada, and J. Shen, “Loss of PINK1 causes mitochondrial functional defects and increased sensitivity to oxidative stress,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 105, no. 32, pp. 11364–11369, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. Y. Mei, Y. Zhang, K. Yamamoto, W. Xie, T. W. Mak, and H. You, “FOXO3a-dependent regulation of Pink1 (Park6) mediates survival signaling in response to cytokine deprivation,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 106, no. 13, pp. 5153–5158, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. K. M. Jacobs, J. D. Pennington, K. S. Bisht et al., “SIRT3 interacts with the daf-16 homolog FOXO3a in the mitochondria, as well as increases FOXO3a dependent gene expression,” International Journal of Biological Sciences, vol. 4, no. 5, pp. 291–299, 2008. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. K. T. Howitz, K. J. Bitterman, H. Y. Cohen et al., “Small molecule activators of sirtuins extend Saccharomyces cerevisiae lifespan,” Nature, vol. 425, no. 6954, pp. 191–196, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. D. K. Das, S. Mukherjee, and D. Ray, “Resveratrol and red wine, healthy heart and longevity,” Heart Failure Reviews, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 425–435, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. Y. Shi, G. G. Camici, and T. F. Lüscher, “Cardiovascular determinants of life span,” Pflügers Archiv, vol. 459, no. 2, pp. 315–324, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  12. G. Petrovski and D. K. Das, “Does autophagy take a front seat in lifespan extension?” Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, vol. 14, no. 11, pp. 2543–2551, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. S. Mukherjee, I. Lekli, N. Gurusamy, A. A. A. Bertelli, and D. K. Das, “Expression of the longevity proteins by both red and white wines and their cardioprotective components, resveratrol, tyrosol, and hydroxytyrosol,” Free Radical Biology and Medicine, vol. 46, no. 5, pp. 573–578, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. B. Juhasz, S. Mukherjee, and D. K. Das, “Hormetic response of resveratrol against cardioprotection,” Experimental and Clinical Cardiology, vol. 15, no. 4, pp. e134–e138, 2010. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. S. Mukherjee, D. Ray, I. Lekli, I. Bak, A. Tosaki, and D. K. Das, “Effects of longevinex (modified resveratrol) on cardioprotection and its mechanisms of action,” Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, vol. 88, no. 11, pp. 1017–1025, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. I. Lekli, D. Ray, S. Mukherjee et al., “Co-ordinated autophagy with resveratrol and γ-tocotrienol confers synergetic cardioprotection,” Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, vol. 14, no. 10, pp. 2506–2518, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. S. Mukherjee, D. Ray, I. Lekli, I. Bak, A. Tosaki, and D. K. Das, “Effects of longevinex (modified resveratrol) on cardioprotection and its mechanisms of action,” Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, vol. 88, no. 11, pp. 1017–1025, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. E. C. Ferber, B. Peck, O. Delpuech, G. P. Bell, P. East, and A. Schulze, “FOXO3a regulates reactive oxygen metabolism by inhibiting mitochondrial gene expression,” Cell Death and Differentiation, vol. 19, no. 6, pp. 968–979, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. J. Benner, H. Daniel, and B. Spanier, “A glutathione peroxidase, intracellular peptidases and the tor complexes regulate peptide transporter PEPT-1 in C. elegans,” PLoS ONE, vol. 6, no. 9, Article ID e25624, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. S. Mukherjee, H. Gangopadhyay, and D. K. Das, “Broccoli: a unique vegetable that protects mammalian hearts through the redox cycling of the thioredoxin superfamily,” Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 56, no. 2, pp. 609–617, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. E. L. Eskelinen, “To be or not to be? Examples of incorrect identification of autophagic compartments in conventional transmission electron microscopy of mammalian cells,” Autophagy, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 257–260, 2008. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. D. J. Klionsky, H. Abeliovich, P. Agostinis et al., “Guidelines for the use and interpretation of assays for monitoring autophagy in higher eukaryotes,” Autophagy, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 151–175, 2008. View at Google Scholar
  23. N. Gurusamy, I. Lekli, N. V. Gorbunov, M. Gherghiceanu, L. M. Popescu, and D. K. Das, “Cardioprotection by adaptation to ischaemia augments autophagy in association with BAG-1 protein,” Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 373–387, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. I. K. M. Law, L. Liu, A. Xu et al., “Identification and characterization of proteins interacting with SIRT1 and SIRT3: implications in the antiaging and metabolic effects of sirtuins,” Proteomics, vol. 9, no. 9, pp. 2444–2456, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. S. Mukherjee, I. Lekli, N. Gurusamy, A. A. A. Bertelli, and D. K. Das, “Expression of the longevity proteins by both red and white wines and their cardioprotective components, resveratrol, tyrosol, and hydroxytyrosol,” Free Radical Biology and Medicine, vol. 46, no. 5, pp. 573–578, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. C. Mannari, A. A. E. Bertelli, G. Stiaccini, and L. Giovannini, “Wine, sirtuins and nephroprotection: not only resveratrol,” Medical Hypotheses, vol. 75, no. 6, pp. 636–638, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. S. D. Westerheide, J. Anckar, S. M. Stevens Jr., L. Sistonen, and R. I. Morimoto, “Stress-inducible regulation of heat shock factor 1 by the deacetylase SIRT,” Science, vol. 323, no. 5917, pp. 1063–1066, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. V. Calabrese, C. Cornelius, A. T. Dinkova-Kostova et al., “Cellular stress responses, hormetic phytochemicals and vitagenes in aging and longevity,” Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, vol. 1822, no. 5, pp. 753–783, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. M. Das and D. K. Das, “Resveratrol and cardiovascular health,” Molecular Aspects of Medicine, vol. 31, no. 6, pp. 503–512, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. K. M. Jacobs, J. D. Pennington, K. S. Bisht et al., “SIRT3 interacts with the daf-16 homolog FOXO3a in the mitochondria, as well as increases FOXO3a dependent gene expression,” International Journal of Biological Sciences, vol. 4, no. 5, pp. 291–299, 2008. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. F. Wang, C. H. Chan, K. Chen, X. Guan, H. K. Lin, and Q. Tong, “Deacetylation of FOXO3 by SIRT1 or SIRT2 leads to Skp2-mediated FOXO3 ubiquitination and degradation,” Oncogene, vol. 31, no. 12, pp. 1546–1557, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. G. Rizki, T. N. Iwata, J. Li et al., “The evolutionarily conserved longevity determinants HCF-1 and SIR-2.1/SIRT1 collaborate to regulate DAF-16/FOXO,” PLoS Genetics, vol. 7, no. 9, Article ID e1002235, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. D. Frescas, L. Valenti, and D. Accili, “Nuclear trapping of the forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 via sirt-dependent deacetylation promotes expression of glucogenetic genes,” Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 280, no. 21, pp. 20589–20595, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. Y. Zeng, L. Cheng, H. Chen et al., “Effects of FOXO genotypes on longevity: a biodemographic analysis,” Journals of Gerontology A, vol. 65, no. 12, pp. 1285–1299, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. M. Soerensen, S. Dato, K. Christensen et al., “Replication of an association of variation in the FOXO3A gene with human longevity using both case-control and longitudinal data,” Aging Cell, vol. 9, no. 6, pp. 1010–1017, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. Y. Mei, Y. Zhang, K. Yamamoto, W. Xie, T. W. Mak, and H. You, “FOXO3a-dependent regulation of Pink1 (Park6) mediates survival signaling in response to cytokine deprivation,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 106, no. 13, pp. 5153–5158, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. J. Sämann, J. Hegermann, E. von Gromoff, S. Eimer, R. Baumeister, and E. Schmidt, “Caenorhabditits elegans LRK-1 and PINK-1 act antagonistically in stress response and neurite outgrowth,” Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 284, no. 24, pp. 16482–16491, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. D. Wang, L. Qian, H. Xiong et al., “Antioxidants protect PINK1-dependent dopaminergic neurons in Drosophila,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 103, no. 36, pp. 13520–13525, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. W. Liu, R. Acín-Peréz, K. D. Geghman, G. Manfredi, B. Lu, and C. Li, “Pink1 regulates the oxidative phosphorylation machinery via mitochondrial fission,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 108, no. 31, pp. 12920–12924, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. C. Vassalle, A. Mercuri, and S. Maffei, “Oxidative status and cardiovascular risk in women: keeping pink at heart,” World Journal of Cardiology, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 26–30, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  41. C. A. Gautier, T. Kitada, and J. Shen, “Loss of PINK1 causes mitochondrial functional defects and increased sensitivity to oxidative stress,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 105, no. 32, pp. 11364–11369, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. E. Ziviani and A. J. Whitworth, “How could Parkin-mediated ubiquitination of mitofusin promote mitophagy?” Autophagy, vol. 6, no. 5, pp. 660–662, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. L. A. Kane and R. J. Youle, “PINK1 and Parkin flag miro to direct mitochondrial traffic,” Cell, vol. 147, no. 4, pp. 721–723, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. A. S. Rambold and J. Lippincott-Schwartz, “Mechanisms of mitochondria and autophagy crosstalk,” Cell Cycle, vol. 10, no. 23, pp. 4032–4038, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  45. A. Rakovic, A. Grünewald, J. Kottwitz et al., “Mutations in PINK1 and Parkin impair ubiquitination of Mitofusins in human fibroblasts,” PLoS ONE, vol. 6, no. 3, Article ID e16746, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  46. S. Geisler, K. M. Holmström, D. Skujat et al., “PINK1/Parkin-mediated mitophagy is dependent on VDAC1 and p62/SQSTM1,” Nature Cell Biology, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 119–131, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  47. D. R. Green, L. Galluzzi, and G. Kroemer, “Mitochondria and the autophagy-inflammation-cell death axis in organismal aging,” Science, vol. 333, no. 6046, pp. 1109–1112, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus