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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2014, Article ID 497802, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/497802
Review Article

Oxidative Stress and Metabolic Syndrome: Cause or Consequence of Alzheimer's Disease?

1Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Autónoma de Coahuila, Boulevard V. Carranza S/N, Colonia República Oriente, Saltillo, COAH, Mexico
2Laboratorio de Nutrición Experimental, Instituto Nacional de Pediatría, Insurgentes Sur 3700 letra C, Coyoacán, 04530 Mexico City, Mexico
3Departamento de Fisiología Biofísica y Neurociencias, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, 2508, 07360 Mexico City, Mexico
4Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Avenida Insurgentes Sur 3000, Coyoacán, 04510 Mexico City, Mexico
5Laboratorio Experimental de Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía Manuel Velasco Suárez, Insurgentes Sur 3877, 14269 Mexico City, Mexico

Received 12 September 2013; Revised 2 December 2013; Accepted 18 December 2013; Published 20 January 2014

Academic Editor: José Pedraza-Chaverri

Copyright © 2014 Diana Luque-Contreras et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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