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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2014, Article ID 646909, 22 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/646909
Review Article

Kynurenines with Neuroactive and Redox Properties: Relevance to Aging and Brain Diseases

1Departamento de Neuroquímica, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía Manuel Velasco Suárez, S.S.A., Insurgentes Sur 3877, 14269 México, DF, Mexico
2Área de Neurociencias, Departamento de Biología de la Reproducción, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, 09340 México, DF, Mexico
3Laboratorio de Neuroinmunología, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía Manuel Velasco Suárez, S.S.A., 14269 México, DF, Mexico
4Departamento de Biología, Facultad de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 04510 México, DF, Mexico

Received 10 October 2013; Revised 12 December 2013; Accepted 15 December 2013; Published 17 February 2014

Academic Editor: Sathyasaikumar V. Korrapati

Copyright © 2014 Jazmin Reyes Ocampo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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