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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2014, Article ID 705253, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/705253
Review Article

Caenorhabditis elegans: A Useful Model for Studying Metabolic Disorders in Which Oxidative Stress Is a Contributing Factor

1Laboratory of Experimental Nutrition, National Institute of Pediatrics, 04530 Mexico City, DF, Mexico
2Laboratory of Neurochemistry, National Institute of Pediatrics, 04530 Mexico City, DF, Mexico
3Department of Biology, Faculty of Chemistry, University City, UNAM, 04150 Mexico City, DF, Mexico

Received 13 February 2014; Revised 25 April 2014; Accepted 29 April 2014; Published 18 May 2014

Academic Editor: Xiaoqian Chen

Copyright © 2014 Elizabeth Moreno-Arriola et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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