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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2014, Article ID 920676, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/920676
Research Article

Circulating Levels of Sirtuin 4, a Potential Marker of Oxidative Metabolism, Related to Coronary Artery Disease in Obese Patients Suffering from NAFLD, with Normal or Slightly Increased Liver Enzymes

1Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University Medical School of Naples, Via Sergio Pansini 5, 80131 Naples, Italy
2Centro Ricerche Oncologiche di Mercogliano, Istituto Nazionale Per Lo Studio E La Cura Dei Tumori “Fondazione Giovanni Pascale”, IRCCS, 83013 Mercogliano, Italy
3Center of Obesity and Eating Disorders, Stella Maris Mediterraneum Foundation, C/da Santa Lucia, Chiaromonte, 80035 Potenza, Italy
4Department of Biochemistry and Medical Biotechnology, Federico II University Medical School of Naples, Via Sergio Pansini 5, 80131 Naples, Italy
5Department of Neuroscience, Unit of Clinical Pharmacology, Federico II University Medical School of Naples, Via Sergio Pansini 5, 80131 Naples, Italy

Received 23 January 2014; Accepted 23 May 2014; Published 17 June 2014

Academic Editor: Tomas Mracek

Copyright © 2014 Giovanni Tarantino et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The present study shows low circulating levels of SIRT4 in obese patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease mirroring its reduced mitochondrial expression in an attempt to increase the fat oxidative capacity and then the mitochondrial function in liver and in muscle. SIRT4 modulates the metabolism of free fatty acids reducing their high circulating levels but, unfortunately, increasing ROS production. Great concentration of free fatty acids, released by adipose tissue, coupled with oxidative stress, directly results in endothelial dysfunction, early atherosclerosis, and coronary artery disease risk factor.