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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 296146, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/296146
Research Article

Generation of Adducts of 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal with Heat Shock 60 kDa Protein 1 in Human Promyelocytic HL-60 and Monocytic THP-1 Cell Lines

1Dipartimento di Medicina e Scienze della Salute, Università del Molise, 86100 Campobasso, Italy
2Dipartimento di Scienze Cliniche e Biologiche, Università di Torino, 10125 Torino, Italy
3Dipartimento di Medicina Molecolare e Biotecnologie Mediche, Università di Napoli Federico II, 80131 Napoli, Italy
4Graduate School of Bioagricultural Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601, Japan
5Centro di Spettrometria di Massa Proteomica e Biomolecolare, ISA-CNR, 83100 Avellino, Italy
6Dipartimento di Agraria, Università di Napoli “Federico II”, Portici, 80055 Napoli, Italy
7William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary University London, London E1 4NS, UK

Received 8 December 2014; Revised 20 April 2015; Accepted 29 April 2015

Academic Editor: Francisco Javier Romero

Copyright © 2015 Alessia Arcaro et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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