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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 397310, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/397310
Research Article

Analysis of Chemokines and Receptors Expression Profile in the Myelin Mutant Taiep Rat

1Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, 14 Sur y Avenida San Claudio, 72570 Puebla, PUE, Mexico
2Laboratorio de Medicina Genómica, Hospital Regional 1° de Octubre, ISSSTE, Avenida Instituto Politécnico Nacional No. 1669, 07760 México, DF, Mexico
3Departamento de Fisiología, Biofísica y Neurociencias, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Apartado Postal 14-740, 07000 México, DF, Mexico
4Instituto de Fisiología, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, 14 Sur 6301, 72560 Puebla, PUE, Mexico
5Laboratorio de Genómica de Celomados, Grupo de Microbiología y Genética de la Escuela de Biología, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Apartado Postal 680002, Bucaramanga, Colombia

Received 21 December 2014; Revised 8 March 2015; Accepted 9 March 2015

Academic Editor: Cinzia Signorini

Copyright © 2015 Guadalupe Soto-Rodriguez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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