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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2015, Article ID 407580, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/407580
Review Article

Sulforaphane Protects against Cardiovascular Disease via Nrf2 Activation

1The Cardiac Surgery Department, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021, China
2The Jilin Province People’s Hospital, Changchun 130021, China
3The Spine Surgery Department, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021, China
4Cancer Center, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021, China

Received 10 January 2015; Revised 20 April 2015; Accepted 28 April 2015

Academic Editor: Anandh B. P. Velayutham

Copyright © 2015 Yang Bai et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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