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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2015, Article ID 489647, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/489647
Research Article

miR-103 Regulates Oxidative Stress by Targeting the BCL2/Adenovirus E1B 19 kDa Interacting Protein 3 in HUVECs

1Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Pudong New Area Gongli Hospital, Shanghai 200135, China
2Department of Cardiology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040, China

Received 28 January 2015; Revised 23 March 2015; Accepted 1 April 2015

Academic Editor: Zhao Zhong Chong

Copyright © 2015 Mao-Chun Xu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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