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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2015, Article ID 490613, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/490613
Research Article

Integrated Haematological Profiles of Redox Status, Lipid, and Inflammatory Protein Biomarkers in Benign Obesity and Unhealthy Obesity with Metabolic Syndrome

1Section of Medical Pathophysiology, Endocrinology and Food Science, Department of Experimental Medicine, “Sapienza” University, “Umberto I” Polyclinic, Viale Regina Elena 324, 00161 Rome, Italy
2Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, University of Ferrara, Via Luigi Borsari 46, 44100 Ferrara, Italy
3Department of Food and Nutrition, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea
4Active Longevity Clinic “Institut Krasoty na Arbate”, 8 Maly Nikolopeskovsky Lane, Moscow 119002, Russia
5Centre of Innovative Biotechnological Investigations (Cibi-NanoLab), 197 Vernadskogo Prospekt, Moscow 119571, Russia

Received 15 December 2014; Revised 11 April 2015; Accepted 20 April 2015

Academic Editor: Antonio Ayala

Copyright © 2015 Carla Lubrano et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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