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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2015, Article ID 509654, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/509654
Review Article

Mitochondrial Dysfunction Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s Disease

1Laboratory of Neurodegenerative Diseases, Centro de Investigación Biomédica, Universidad Autónoma de Chile, San Miguel, 8900000 Santiago, Chile
2Departamento de Kinesiología, Universidad Metropolitana de Ciencias de la Educación, Ñuñoa, 7760197 Santiago, Chile

Received 17 March 2015; Revised 9 June 2015; Accepted 18 June 2015

Academic Editor: Matthew C. Zimmerman

Copyright © 2015 Fabian A. Cabezas-Opazo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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