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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2015, Article ID 593658, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/593658
Research Article

Association of the Apolipoprotein E 2 Allele with Concurrent Occurrence of Endometrial Hyperplasia and Endometrial Carcinoma

1A. Cyb Scientific Centre of Radiology of the Hertsen Federal Medical Research Centre of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, 10 Zhukov Street, Obninsk, Kaluga Region 249036, Russia
2Federal State Budget Institution of Sciences Institute of Gene Biology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 34/5 Vavilova Street, Moscow 119334, Russia
3Federal State Budget Institution of Sciences N.I. Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 3 Gubkin Street, Moscow 117971, Russia
4Federal Research Center of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Immunology Named after Dmitry Rogachev, The Russian Ministry of Health and Social Development, 1 Samora Machel Street, Moscow 117198, Russia

Received 14 December 2014; Accepted 19 January 2015

Academic Editor: Liang-Jun Yan

Copyright © 2015 Tatiana I. Ivanova et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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