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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2015, Article ID 638416, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/638416
Review Article

Role of the Lipoperoxidation Product 4-Hydroxynonenal in the Pathogenesis of Severe Malaria Anemia and Malaria Immunodepression

Department of Oncology, University of Torino, Via Santena 5 Bis, 10126 Torino, Italy

Received 25 December 2014; Accepted 31 March 2015

Academic Editor: Thomas Kietzmann

Copyright © 2015 Evelin Schwarzer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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