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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2015, Article ID 787805, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/787805
Research Article

Calcium Channel Blockers, Progression to Dementia, and Effects on Amyloid Beta Peptide Production

1Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506, USA
2Sanders-Brown Center on Aging and Alzheimer’s Disease Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536, USA
3Department of Epidemiology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506, USA
4Departments of Statistics and Biostatistics, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 20536, USA
5National Minority Quality Forum, Washington, DC 20005, USA

Received 22 February 2015; Revised 5 June 2015; Accepted 8 June 2015

Academic Editor: Ada Popolo

Copyright © 2015 Mark A. Lovell et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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