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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 985845, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/985845
Review Article

Diabetes and Alzheimer Disease, Two Overlapping Pathologies with the Same Background: Oxidative Stress

1Centro de Investigación Biomédica de Occidente, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Sierra Mojada 800, Colonia Independencia, 44340 Guadalajara, JAL, Mexico
2Department of Structural Biology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900, USA

Received 11 December 2014; Accepted 10 February 2015

Academic Editor: Angel Catalá

Copyright © 2015 Sergio Rosales-Corral et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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